Report: State of Community Management

The Community Roundtable, founded in 2009 by Jim Storer and Rachel Happe, has deep expertise in advancing the business of community.

The Community Roundtable State of Community Management 2014

This week The Community Roundtable has released the 2014 State of Community Management report, with three key findings:

  1. Community maturity delivers business value.
  2. Advocacy programs increase engagement.
  3. Executive participation impacts success.

To download the full report, click here.

Briefings this week: April 21 – 25

I am taking briefings with these companies this week:

 

Tuesday

  • Sysomos

Wednesday

  • Adobe
  • Beckon

 

As a reminder, I’m interested in hearing from companies that enable customer experience management, provide marketing services (including agencies and consultancies) and support innovation agenda items.

If you are interested in briefing Constellation Research on your marketing technology, visit the Contact Us form.

Briefings this week: April 14 – 18

I am taking briefings with these companies this week:

 

Monday

  • Adobe
  • Alexa

Thursday

  • Hubspot

Friday

  • Sprinklr

 

As a reminder, I’m interested in hearing from companies that enable customer experience management, provide marketing services (including agencies and consultancies) and support innovation agenda items.

If you are interested in briefing Constellation Research on your marketing technology, visit the Contact Us form.

Moving from Typepad to WordPress

After eight years, I’ve finally moved my blog from Typepad to WordPress.

 

Typepad to WordPress

I’ve never sought to make a living from my blog, but I enjoy tinkering around with infrastructure enough to be frustrated with Typepad’s stagnant platform. In the early days, Blogspot, Typepad, and WordPress were all feasible options when starting to blog. These days WordPress seems to be the only real option for blogs, unless you opt for a specialized option like Tumblr or Medium.

Here’s how I made the migration, in case you’re in a similar situation and thinking about making a similar switch.

Assumptions:

  • You’ve got your own domain name, e.g. example.com. If you are only using “example.typepad.com” then you’ll need to buy one.
  • You want a managed hosting solution, rather than maintaining a server and code base yourself.
  • You are comfortable clicking on links and changing numbers and words to point things in the right directions.

1. Prepare your Typepad blog for migration

Typepad makes this pretty simple. In your dashboard, go to Settings > Import/Export and click the Export button.

On the recommendation of several people, including Ray Wang, I used TP2WP to convert the Typepad export file to a WordPress-friendlier format. Was it worth the $49? Not sure, given that I didn’t try to import the original file directly. But I’ll assume that TP2WP saved me a bunch of cleanup effort, given what’s listed on their “how it works” page.

2. Set up your new WordPress environment

I knew that I did not want to set up or manage a hosting environment. When I was head of global digital marketing at PUMA, I negotiated the contracts for hosting our brand and ecommerce sites, including SLAs, server types, peering, CDN,  et al. I downloaded and installed server security patches, monitored uptime, and worked with consultants to load balance and otherwise operate the environment. That was worth millions of dollars for the company; this is a blog.

After considering Bluehost and Dreamhost, I went with WPEngine. They are a fully managed hosting service and while more expensive than do-more-yourself options, I estimate that the price premium is worth the support in security, backups, and other technical support.

3. Import your content

Once I set up my WPEngine account, I had a clean WordPress install. I installed the ReadyMade WordPress Importer plugin to import my unzipped TP2WP converted export file. (If you’ve never installed a WordPress plugin, it’s simple. Just mouseover Plugins, click Add New, then search for what you need or click the link to upload a .zip of a plugin you’ve already downloaded.)

Once the plugin was installed, I went to Tools > Import >ReadyMade WordPress Importer. I selected my .xml file and imported.

At this point, I was up and running on WordPress. I was about four hours in at that point, which included setting up new accounts, conducting research into different options, and messing around with designs and other options.

 4. Redirect the internet

I didn’t have much to clean up, so I was ready for the site to go live. I changed two records with my domain name registrar: the A record to the WPEngine IP address and the www CNAME to example.wpengine.com.

Typepad doesn’t support 301 redirects, so I changed the default blog folder and added a redirection script to the head of the only post’s page and also requested that Google remove example.typepad.com from search results, just in case any duplicate content was indexed.

In the WPEngine admin, I redirected example.wpengine.com and example.com to www.example.com. In WordPress admin, I set Settings > General to the new site, i.e. WordPress Address (URL) and Site Address (URL) are both www.example.com.

WordPress RSS feeds work a bit differently than Typepad, so in case anyone in the world still uses RSS, I updated the feed address in Feedburner. My new feed is www.example.com/feed/atom.

Search engine sitemaps needed to be updated as well. There are many plugins that can generate these; I used the recommended BWP Google XML Sitemaps.

5. That’s it

Really. All in, it took about six hours of effort to finish, which was just about the amount of time that the DNS took to redirect from Typepad to WordPress.

I still have a lot to tweak, but that can happen over time. WordPress has a world of options for design themes, increased speed, SEO, and more. If you’ve read this far and have suggestions for good plugins, let me know!

From Typepad to WordPress: the financials

In summary, I was out of pocket $49 for TP2WP migration and will pay $29/month for WPEngine managed hosting. This is a bit more than the $11/month I’ve paid Typepad for Pro Unlimited service, but I think the premium is acceptable for managed operations and access to a modern platform.

As a comparison, I received a quote from a WordPress specialist who offered to migrate my blog for $1,260 and provide hosting (but no support) for $25/month.

Not a bad day’s work when put in that perspective, if you ask me.

What’s in a name? #gTLD

What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;

Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

With the rollout of new gTLDs, it’s just a matter of time until the .com addresses we have grown familiar with over the past 15 – 20 years start to disappear. Here are the domains that are available today and coming soon, via IANA.

Major brands and organizations have already lawyered up and brands like Gucci, Ralph Lauren, Oakley, USPS, Google, Amazon, and others are battling it out in the courts over new domains. I spoke with DomainSkate last week and their blog is a good resource; the company estimates that over 1,400 new domains will become available in 2014.

As if digital marketing didn’t change fast enough — here’s one more issue that marketers need to add to the to-do list; file under brand + SEO.

Briefings this week: March 31 – April 4

Here’s who I’m taking briefings with this week:

 

Tuesday – Thursday

  • SAP CRM 2014

 

As a reminder, I’m interested in hearing from companies that enable customer experience management, provide marketing services (including agencies and consultancies) and support innovation agenda items.

If you are interested in briefing Constellation Research on your marketing technology, visit the Contact Us form.

IBMiX

IBM bankrolls a new $100M #CX unit. Will it work?

Yesterday, IBM announced expansion plans for its Interactive Experience professional services practice. The numbers align a bit too perfectly: 10 new labs, $100M investment, and 1,000 new roles.

#IBMiX

While the numbers sound great, here’s what matters:

  • Access to technology. Brands need to connect with customers along all points of the buying/loyalty loop, same as it ever was. But today, engagement is impossibly inefficient without the help of technology. On the front lines, high tech enables high touch experiences. We could always assume that IBM services had access to the firm’s leading-edge research and this announcement includes specifics regarding influence analysis, intelligent customer profiles, and customer identity resolution, in addition to behavioral pricing, life event detection, and psycholinguistics analytics.
  • Global scale. In addition to four Experience Labs in North America, IBM adds 10 locations that provide presence on all continents with the exception of Africa and Antarctica. This allows the firm to match the operating needs of multinational clients, in addition to collecting local insights that can be transferred to broader programs. For example, consider the social media ecosystem in China, which has influenced the roadmaps of Silicon Valley-based platforms (and vice versa).
  • Ability to sign talent. Finding great talent that can pair campaign creativity with quantitative analysis is difficult, and constrained supply drives higher prices. IBM can afford to poach talent from other firms, as evidenced by its hires from Accenture, Wunderman, SapientNitro, DigitasLBi, CapGemini, and Ogilvy. IBM is the professional services equivalent of the New York Yankees.

But I wouldn’t consider the game over yet by any means. In fact, some of these strengths come with significant challenges:

  • Legacy branding. International Business Machines has a world renown legacy in enterprise hardware and the current software organization is also well-known. These groups capture the public’s attention with innovations like Watson and support of the US Open, which can lead to consulting business. However, internal corporate relationships could lead buyers to lean towards other firms that may not carry a perception of bias towards proprietary technology solutions.
  • You don’t have to be the biggest to be the best. Consider the change that technology has driven in the agency landscape; the traditional agencies with roots in the mad men era have been increasingly displaced by smaller shops that are nimble and can react to shifts in current culture. IBM claims to be a “new breed of service provider” but it must be careful that the positioning doesn’t become a Napoleonic mistake of creating competition on too many fronts. Moreover, IBM needs to operationalize knowledge from its global network without letting its sheer size get in the way of learning.
  • Fast enough? IBM isn’t alone in seeing the marketing opportunity around digital customer experience. Two years ago, Deloitte acquired Ubermind to create Deloitte Digital. Last year, Accenture acquired Fjord and formed Accenture Interactive. Good help is hard to find in this market, which is why SIs are buying digital shops to get in the game quickly. IBM has been hiring talent from the right places, but this one-at-a-time approach may not be a fast enough ramp, leaving money on the table for competitors.

IBM sees the market opportunity in customer experience and appears committed to winning in the market. There are a couple of elements in this announcement that take me back to 2008 as I launched my last company — “a new service provider that’s agency + consultancy” and a multi-million dollar funding commitment — and the emerging opportunity seems to be wide open. If nothing else, IBM is signalling to potential clients and hires that they’re open for business as the “social business” era fades into the next generation of digital transformation.

Briefings this week: March 24 – 28

Here’s who I’m speaking with this week:

Monday

Tuesday – Wednesday

Friday

  • BearingPoint
  • LittleBird

As a reminder, I’m interested in hearing from companies that enable customer experience management, provide marketing services (including agencies and consultancies) and support innovation agenda items.

If you are interested in briefing Constellation Research on your marketing technology, visit the Contact Us form.

Three Wildfire alternatives

Wildfire Evaluation Guide

I’ve spoken with two vendors this week that are experiencing an influx of inbound interest based on Wildfire’s impending shutdown.

I’m also discovering that not all buyers are ready to commit to the idea of a massive integrated social business platform.

If you find yourself in a position to explore Wildfire alternatives, here are a few choices to consider:

I did not find any public statements from Hootsuite, Adobe, Oracle, or Salesforce regarding Wildfire.

Social business and beyond.